Any questions?   ARCHAEOLOGY.   PHOTOGRAPHY.   AFRICA.   WORDS.   WILDLIFE.   Awesome Science People   

Sam | archaeologist | 22
Original Archaeology Posts
Original Photography Posts
@Samaeolithic

A mostly archaeological-related blog, but I also occasionally post photographs, wildlife/conservation related things, and other stuff I find interesting and/or important. A bit of variety's good for you!
Creative Commons Licence

anthrocentric:

theolduvaigorge:

survivethrive:

(via Backpacks Infographic: How to Find the Right Backpack - REI)

This is pretty solid. There’s often a small inner pouch on the side that lies against your spine where you can pack the heavy stuff compactly. My Osprey was moulded to my body shape and is designed for people with breasts, so the large straps are oriented slightly differently to make room for boob bulk. If you tighten all the compression straps, tightly pull the straps across your clavicles and waist, and tighten the top bit so the topmost compartment doesn’t sag, the weight will distribute so as to not strain your muscles well beyond all holy hell. It will still be heavy if you pack a great lot but you won’t have that dragging agony on your neck and shoulders, nor will you want to collapse from lower back pain every time you bend and stand. Backpacks aren’t cheap but if you travel often, it’s worth the investment. 

***What to take: dental floss too.

***What to leave: take your hands off my interwebs. I need Google maps, thank you kindly.

For multi-day drips, some small items I personally also always have

1. My Leatherman (multipurpose tools)
2. 10% ethanol solution
3. String. Lots of string.
4. Bells
5. Bug spray

You try to have as little heavy stuff and as much collapsible stuff as possible (or at least distribute it around with other people), but there was one time I was out in the woods and we spent forever finding water because many of the small creeks were dried up, we weren’t familiar with the endemic plants, and ended up collecting water dripping from narrow crevices using a frying pan. I will never oppose to bringing a frying pan on a trip ever again (even though just about anything else would had worked just as well).

Plastic bags are great too! Out of interest anthrocentric, what are the bells for?

— 18 hours ago with 431 notes
#hiking  #fieldwork  #rucksack  #pack your kit properly 
clioancientart:

Gold body chain from the Hoxne Treaure, buried in the 5th century AD. Found at Hoxne, Suffolk, UK in 1992.
The Hoxne (pronounced ‘Hoxon’) hoard is a rich find of treasure from Roman Britain. Alongside approximately 15,000 coins were many other precious objects, buried for safety at a time when Britain was passing out of Roman control. The body-chain is a type of ornament which had a long history and can be seen in representations in both Hellenistic and Roman art but actual examples are extremely rare. The chains passed over the shoulders and under the arms of the wearer, with a decorative focus where they join on the chest and the back. This example is very small and could only have been worn by a slender, perhaps very young, woman. The 2 plaques where the chains join comprise a gold coin of Emperor Gratian (AD 367-383) in a decorative mount, and an oval setting for 9 gems, a central amethyst, 4 garnets, and 4 empty round settings which probably contained pearls, now completely decayed. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

clioancientart:

Gold body chain from the Hoxne Treaure, buried in the 5th century AD.
Found at Hoxne, Suffolk, UK in 1992.

The Hoxne (pronounced ‘Hoxon’) hoard is a rich find of treasure from Roman Britain. Alongside approximately 15,000 coins were many other precious objects, buried for safety at a time when Britain was passing out of Roman control. The body-chain is a type of ornament which had a long history and can be seen in representations in both Hellenistic and Roman art but actual examples are extremely rare. The chains passed over the shoulders and under the arms of the wearer, with a decorative focus where they join on the chest and the back. This example is very small and could only have been worn by a slender, perhaps very young, woman. The 2 plaques where the chains join comprise a gold coin of Emperor Gratian (AD 367-383) in a decorative mount, and an oval setting for 9 gems, a central amethyst, 4 garnets, and 4 empty round settings which probably contained pearls, now completely decayed. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

(Source: clioancientart.com, via cwnerd12)

— 1 day ago with 306 notes
johnthelutheran:

rhube:

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.
They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.
And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.
And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.
Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.
So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.
Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).
This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

Fantastic.

The Great Green Wall, to resist the encroachment of the Sahara. Fascinating.

johnthelutheran:

rhube:

jenniferrpovey:

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

Oh yes, acacia trees.

They fix nitrogen and improve soil quality.

And, to make things fun, the species they’re using practices “reverse leaf phenology.” The trees go dormant in the rainy season and then grow their leaves again in the dry season. This means you can plant crops under the trees, in that nitrogen-rich soil, and the trees don’t compete for light because they don’t have any leaves on.

And then in the dry season, you harvest the leaves and feed them to your cows.

Crops grown under acacia trees have better yield than those grown without them. Considerably better.

So, this isn’t just about stopping the advancement of the Sahara - it’s also about improving food security for the entire sub-Saharan belt and possibly reclaiming some of the desert as productive land.

Of course, before the “green revolution,” the farmers knew to plant acacia trees - it’s a traditional practice that they were convinced to abandon in favor of “more reliable” artificial fertilizers (that caused soil degradation, soil erosion, etc).

This is why you listen to the people who, you know, have lived with and on land for centuries.

Fantastic.

The Great Green Wall, to resist the encroachment of the Sahara. Fascinating.

(via keseral)

— 2 days ago with 57360 notes
#reforestation  #sahara encroachment  #sahara  #desert  #africa  #acacia 
Baghdad Archaeological Museum Reopens To The Public

archaeologicalnews:

image

Despite the troubles plaguing Iraq, The Baghdad Archaeological Museum has reopened to the public. The museum which only offered limited access to academics was established with the help of the British author Gertrude Bell in 1926. In the 1920s the Museum was under the Ministry of Public Works while under the Ministry of Education in the 1930s. Its collections are considered among the most important in the world and the Museum has traditionally exhibited collections featuring the 5,000 year long history of Mesopotamia in its 28 galleries.

The original buildings (Old Museum building, Administration Building, Library, and Old Storage Building) were built on the present site with the help of the German Government in 1964-1966 and opened in 1966. The New Museum Building was built by the Italian Government in 1983. The newest building, the New Collections Building, was built by Kortage Construction in 2006 sponsored by the Iraqi Government. Read more.

— 3 days ago with 173 notes
#archaeology  #baghdad  #museum  #iraq 
suzythered:

Reminder why it’s important to distinguish between horse and pony when recording zooarchaeological material.

suzythered:

Reminder why it’s important to distinguish between horse and pony when recording zooarchaeological material.

(via valdanderthal)

— 3 days ago with 22 notes
#animal bones  #horses  #equid  #bones  #dem bones dem bones 

casethejointfirst:

sixpenceee:

HOW THE MOKIN CHILDREN ARE ABLE TO SEE WITH AMAZING CLARITY UNDERWATER

The Mokin are a group in Thailand that are nomadic and have a sea-based culture. 

In the sea there is less light, so usually one’s iris will dilate. But the Mokin have an adaption where instead of dilating, they constrict as much as possible. 

This allows them to see with much better clarity. Recent studies suggest that any child can quickly learn this trick. It exemplifies how well our brain adapts to our environment. 

SOURCE 

You may also like: SWIMMING BABIES

Can I learn how to do this?!

(via oosik)

— 3 days ago with 35485 notes
#holy crap  #eyes  #science  #adaptation  #swimming  #underwater  #this is freaking amazing 
Flag Counter