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Sam | archaeologist | 23
Original Archaeology Posts
Original Photography Posts
@Samaeolithic

A mostly archaeological-related blog, but I also occasionally post photographs, wildlife/conservation related things, and other stuff I find interesting and/or important. A bit of variety's good for you!
Creative Commons Licence

nubbsgalore:

farmers collect marigolds which are then sold wholesale and made into garlands for the durga puja festival, which ended last week, and upcoming diwali festivities held in two weeks. photos by (click pic) channi anand on the outskirts of jammu; rajesh kumar singh in lucknow and jammu; vivek prakash in mumbai; sudipto das in panskura; jaipal singh in kashmir; rupak de chowdhuri and dibyangshu sarka in kolkata; and abhishek n. chinnappa in bangalore

(via ooksaidthelibrarian)

— 1 day ago with 2599 notes
aleyma:

Jadeite axe, made in France, 8000-5000 BC (source).

aleyma:

Jadeite axe, made in France, 8000-5000 BC (source).

— 1 week ago with 71 notes
#art  #jade  #ancient  #neolithic 
periculaludus:

Neolithic lake dwellings on the German side of Lake Constance

periculaludus:

Neolithic lake dwellings on the German side of Lake Constance

— 1 week ago with 3 notes
#lake constance  #germany  #neolithic 

golgothacommunicationsltd:

The Funnelbeaker ‘long barrows’ at Wietrzychowice and Sarnowo, in Poland, built circa 4000 BCE.

Neat.

— 1 week ago with 46 notes
#Funnelbeaker culture  #Poland  #neolithic 
archaicwonder:

Broch of Gurness
The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village on the northwest coast of Mainland Orkney in Scotland overlooking Eynhallow Sound. It is one of the most outstanding surviving examples of a later prehistoric settlement that is unique to northern Scotland.
Dates for the broch are unclear, but it is generally agreed that it was built between 200 and 100 BC - possibly on the site of an earlier settlement. The entire settlement was circled by outer defences comprising of a band of three ramparts and three ditches.
As time progressed, the broch’s defensive role decreased, until around 100 AD, after years of neglect, it was finally abandoned and its upper sections dismantled - probably to provide the building material for later houses in the area. Over the ensuing years, its walls continued to be reduced, as stone provided a valuable source of building material.


photo by The K Team

archaicwonder:

Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village on the northwest coast of Mainland Orkney in Scotland overlooking Eynhallow Sound. It is one of the most outstanding surviving examples of a later prehistoric settlement that is unique to northern Scotland.

Dates for the broch are unclear, but it is generally agreed that it was built between 200 and 100 BC - possibly on the site of an earlier settlement. The entire settlement was circled by outer defences comprising of a band of three ramparts and three ditches.

As time progressed, the broch’s defensive role decreased, until around 100 AD, after years of neglect, it was finally abandoned and its upper sections dismantled - probably to provide the building material for later houses in the area. Over the ensuing years, its walls continued to be reduced, as stone provided a valuable source of building material.

photo by The K Team

— 3 weeks ago with 1283 notes
#broch  #Iron Age  #Scottish archaeology  #archaeology  #monumental architecture  #stone tower 
archaicwonder:

Dun Aengus (Dún Aonghasa), Inishmore, Ireland
Dun Aengus is the most famous of several prehistoric forts on the Aran Islands of County Galway, Ireland. It is on Inishmore, at the edge of an 100 meter high cliff. The first construction goes back to 1100 BC, when the first enclosure was erected by piling rubble against large upright stones. Around 500 BC, the triple wall defenses were probably built along the western side of fort. Its name, meaning “Fort of Aonghas”, refers to the pre-Christian god of the same name described in Irish mythology, or the mythical king, Aonghus mac Úmhór.

archaicwonder:

Dun Aengus (Dún Aonghasa), Inishmore, Ireland

Dun Aengus is the most famous of several prehistoric forts on the Aran Islands of County Galway, Ireland. It is on Inishmore, at the edge of an 100 meter high cliff. The first construction goes back to 1100 BC, when the first enclosure was erected by piling rubble against large upright stones. Around 500 BC, the triple wall defenses were probably built along the western side of fort. Its name, meaning “Fort of Aonghas”, refers to the pre-Christian god of the same name described in Irish mythology, or the mythical king, Aonghus mac Úmhór.

— 3 weeks ago with 1793 notes
#Dun Aengus  #fort  #Iron age  #dun  #archaeology  #Irish  #erosion 
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